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Scientific proof for karma? Small acts of kindness boost well-being

publication date: Sep 23, 2011
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Yet another study reports that giving and volunteering lead to happiness. What's more, the boost in mood stays with you for months, according to research out of York University. More than 700 people took part in a study which charted the effects of being nice to others, in small doses, over the course of a week.

Researchers asked participants to act compassionately towards someone for five to 15 minutes a day, by actively helping or interacting with them in a supportive and considerate manner. Six months after that week, participants were still reporting increased happiness and self-esteem.

Minutes a day can change your life

"The concept of compassion and kindness resonates with so many religious traditions, yet it has received little empirical evidence until recently," says lead author Myriam Mongrain, associate professor of psychology in York's Faculty of Health.

"What's amazing is that the time investment required for these changes to occur is so small. We're talking about mere minutes a day," she continues.

Participants' levels of depression, happiness and self-esteem were assessed at the study's onset, and at four subsequent points over the following six months. Those in the group acting compassionately reported significantly greater increases in self-esteem and happiness at six months compared to those in the control group.

Charity, self-esteem: what's the connection? 

So why does doing good for others make us feel good about ourselves?

"We reaffirm that we are ‘good,' which is a highly-valued trait in our society. It is also possible that being kind to others may help us be kind to ourselves," Mongrain says. She notes that previous studies have demonstrated a causal relationship between compassionate behaviours and charitable self-evaluations.

"Compassion cuts both ways," she explains. "If you make a conscious decision to not be so hard on others, it becomes easier to not be so hard on yourself. Furthermore, providing support to others often means that we will get support back. That is why caring for and helping others may be the best possible thing we can do for ourselves. On a less selfish level, there is something intrinsically satisfying about helping others and witnessing their gratitude," says Mongrain.

Compassion adds meaning 

Not surprisingly, research has also shown that compassionate activities increase the level of meaning in one's life, which in turn elevates levels of happiness.

Researchers expected that those with needy personalities would experience greater reductions in depressive symptoms and greater increases in happiness and self-esteem as a result of being kind to others.

"We hypothesized this would occur as a result of the reassurance [needy personalities] might extract from positive exchanges with others," Mongrain says. "We did see some reduction in depressive symptoms for anxiously attached individuals, but further research is needed to see if there is any long-term benefit."

The study, "Practicing Compassion Increases Happiness and Self-Esteem" appeared in the spring 2011 issue of the Journal of Happiness Studies. It is co-authored by York University researchers Jacqueline Chin and Leah Shapira.

For more information, Melissa Hughes, Media Relations, York University, 416-736-2100  x22097, mehughes@yorku.ca

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